wocinsolidarity:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police brutality in Ferguson costs taxpayers millions.

.

ghdos:

I’m sure other people have posted about it by now, but there is nothing that made me smile harder today than the NFL finally taking a real stance on domestic violence. It’s something that should have been put into place a long time ago and I’m glad that it’s no longer being…

american-radical:

You can always help in more than one way :-) https://unrwausa.org/donate Anything will help. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said: “Save yourself from hellfire by giving even half a date-fruit in charity.”

american-radical:

You can always help in more than one way :-) https://unrwausa.org/donate
Anything will help. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said: “Save yourself from hellfire by giving even half a date-fruit in charity.”

fotojournalismus:

Palestinians walk at the base of what used to be a high-rise apartment building in Gaza City that was targeted by Israeli air strikes overnight on August 26, 2014. (Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images)

fotojournalismus:

Palestinians walk at the base of what used to be a high-rise apartment building in Gaza City that was targeted by Israeli air strikes overnight on August 26, 2014. (Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images)

lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’

Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014

Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly

Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz

Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis

Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba

Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi

Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

america-wakiewakie:


Death of Handcuffed Lousiana Man Shot in Chest Ruled Suicide | The Root
A Louisiana man who state police claimed shot and killed himself in March while in police custody died, not of a gunshot wound to the back, as police had initially reported, but of a shot to the chest, according to an autopsy report, KATC reports. 


The shooting occurred in the backseat of a patrol car after Victor White III was arrested for drug possession, KLFY notes. White’s hands were apparently cuffed behind his back as he was transported to jail. Once there, the 22-year-old reportedly did not want to get out of the patrol car. At some point, a gun that he was allegedly hiding in his pants appeared and he shot himself in the back, according to police reports.


However, according to KATC, the first page of the autopsy report, released by the Iberia Parish Coroner’s Office, details how White was shot in the chest, completely contradicting earlier police reports made after the fateful night in early March.


The bullet entered the young man’s chest and pierced his left lung and his heart before exiting around his armpit, according to the autopsy, which also called White’s death a “suicide.”


“Here is a family that, we are still grieving,” White’s father, Victor White Sr., told KLFY. “I’m angry the autopsy report took so long. I’m angry and frustrated with the fact that it’s still not over.


“My son didn’t shoot himself. I never believed it. I won’t believe it,” the father added. “My initial response was correct, that something was awry, and that something had gone wrong.”

According to KATC, State Police Master Trooper Brooks David acknowledged that the investigation into White’s death is still open. David also confirmed that while law enforcement did initially think that the wound came from the back, the autopsy proved otherwise.


Read more at KATC and KLFY.

america-wakiewakie:

Death of Handcuffed Lousiana Man Shot in Chest Ruled Suicide | The Root

A Louisiana man who state police claimed shot and killed himself in March while in police custody died, not of a gunshot wound to the back, as police had initially reported, but of a shot to the chest, according to an autopsy report, KATC reports

The shooting occurred in the backseat of a patrol car after Victor White III was arrested for drug possession, KLFY notes. White’s hands were apparently cuffed behind his back as he was transported to jail. Once there, the 22-year-old reportedly did not want to get out of the patrol car. At some point, a gun that he was allegedly hiding in his pants appeared and he shot himself in the back, according to police reports.

However, according to KATC, the first page of the autopsy report, released by the Iberia Parish Coroner’s Office, details how White was shot in the chest, completely contradicting earlier police reports made after the fateful night in early March.

The bullet entered the young man’s chest and pierced his left lung and his heart before exiting around his armpit, according to the autopsy, which also called White’s death a “suicide.”

“Here is a family that, we are still grieving,” White’s father, Victor White Sr., told KLFY. “I’m angry the autopsy report took so long. I’m angry and frustrated with the fact that it’s still not over.

“My son didn’t shoot himself. I never believed it. I won’t believe it,” the father added. “My initial response was correct, that something was awry, and that something had gone wrong.”

According to KATC, State Police Master Trooper Brooks David acknowledged that the investigation into White’s death is still open. David also confirmed that while law enforcement did initially think that the wound came from the back, the autopsy proved otherwise.

Read more at KATC and KLFY.

medievalpoc:

rebornasacynic:

babefield:

cusscakes:

medievalpoc:

heartsalchemy:

medievalpoc:

Peter Lely

Portrait of Elizabeth Murray

England (c. 1650)

Oil on canvas, 124 x 119 cm

[x] [x] [x] [x]

I think I have seen pictures of this before, in high school maybe, but I don’t remember there being a second person before. I seem to remember this image being cropped differently too, which is very disturbing because now that I see the entire painting, the way I remember it being cropped was very clearly and deliberately intended to remove the person holding the tray of flowers.

Since we’re throwing haymakers at the kyriarchy today, I think this is something that we should really be talking about too, because it happens

ALL. THE. TIME.

Level 1: People of Color from Medieval, Renaissance, and other Early Modern European works were often literally painted over in later decades or centuries.

For example: In this painting, Giulia de’Medici (the child) was painted over in the 19th century:

image

Level 2: It was very fashionable in a lot of 17th and 18th century paintings to have a Black servant featured in portraits of very important historical figures from European History.

Honestly? They’re practically ubiquitous. A lot of the very famous paintings you’ve seen of European and American historical figures have a Black servant in them that have been cropped out or painted over.

Those silly stock photos from your American History Professor’s Powerpoint?

Your Professor’s PowerPoint for “George Washington”:

image

image

The actual painting:

image

image

Your professor’s Powerpoint on Jean Chardin:

image

The actual painting:

image

PowerPoint on Maria Henriette Stuart (with some commentary about the Habsburg jaw):

image

Actual Painting:

image

But, because of whitewashed history curricula, teachers and professors continue to use the cropped images because they don’t want their lecture to get “derailed” by a discussion about race.

These images are also more commonly seen on stock photo sites, including ones for academic use.

I honestly can’t find anyone really writing about this, or even any analysis on how often the cropped photos are used.

The reason they are so easy to crop out is because of the the artistic conventions which reflect the power hierarchy:

Oil paintings of aristocratic families from this period make the point clearly. Artists routinely positioned black people on the edges or at the rear of their canvasses, from where they gaze wonderingly at their masters and mistresses. In order to reveal a ‘hierarchy of power relationships’, they were often placed next to dogs and other domestic animals, with whom they shared, according to the art critic and novelist David Dabydeen, ‘more or less the same status’. Their humanity effaced, they exist in these pictures as solitary mutes, aesthetic foils to their owners’ economic fortunes.

This is drastically oversimplified, but at least it addresses it directly.

If anyone knows more on any studies or statistical evidence on this tendency, feel free to add it.

I just learned things.

i think about this a lot

My art history teacher told us about this black crusader who was considered a hero in Europe. He showed us some portraits of him, but after time Europeans began to portray him as a white man in artwork. He also showed us medieval paintings of free black men. He said people think there are no medieval paintings of black people, but there are and they just aren’t shown to or seen by many people.

I’m glad to hear that your teacher has been trying to incorporate this kind of material into the curriculum. That’s why I try to include as many educational links and resources as I can along with the images-even professional educators can have a hard time finding these artworks and info about them.

It’s also worth mentioning that part of why I focus on Europe-which is a subject of some valid criticism, considering how little time is usually spent on non-Western cultures in history related classes-is because what MUST be included in U.S. world history education by high schools and colleges is according to strict guidelines that are Eurocentric and/or Western-centric.

Educators  are often working under pretty strict conditions about what they HAVE to teach you. It’s my hope that by providing a lot of specific examples from eras and artists, professors and high school teachers will be able to make their powerpoints and handouts more representative of the people in the classroom and still stay within the dictates of their department or institution.

Ideally, world history and art history will become less Western and Euro-centric, but in the meantime while our history education remains the way it is, these materials can help show that history is more diverse than a lot of textbooks would lead you to believe.

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

sandandglass:

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

johndarnielle:

silversprocket:

Cathy G Johnson has been nominated for this year’s Ignatz Award in “Promising New Talent” for damn good reason. Visit her and vote next month at SPX 2014. Here’s her seriously good (and unfortunately timely) comic from As You Were #3. Visit this Tumblr next week for our interview with Cathy and more arts!

As You Were is a punk-comix anthology series featuring new stories by our favorite independent artists from punk communities around the world. The theme for issue #3 is “Big, Big Changes”, available for [purchase here from Silver Sprocket].

As You Were is a great read and I recommend it!